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is ticking for a dozen activists holding fasts on the national mall to push for immigration reform. those fasters are trying to press the house to take up immigration legislation this year but the house is only in for four more days and prospects are dim with speaker boehner not backing off from his statement that he won't take up the bill passed by the senate before the end of the year. let me bring in congressman mark takano, democrat from california, who held a 24-hour fast last friday in saurolid ar with the activists and eliseo medina. eliso, you were one of four activists who went 22 days without eating. why? and are you seeing any indication that it's having an impact? >> well, chris, the reason we went on this fast is because we wanted to call attention of the american people and of the congress to the moral crisis facing our nation. you know, every year 460 something odd people die in the desert trying to come to the united states. this month it will have been two million people have been deported from our country. now, behind these numbers there's real human beings, people who h
, too, do demands far living wang. and a tactical shift in the ongoing fight for immigration reform. first understanding the impact and importance of president nelson mandela. >> i pledge to use all my strength and ability to live up to expectations. we are going forward. our noorch freedom is irreversible. we must not allow fear to stand in our way. >> good morning. i'm melissa harris-perry. the world lost one of its greatest leaders and agents of social change with the passing of nelson mandela at the age of 95 on thursday. madiba, the clan name by which he was known, transcended the boundaries of south africa as it became synonymous with the country's greatest struggles and triumphs. mandela meant many things to many people, including president obama, who offered this tribute shortly after mandela's death. >> for now, let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived, a man who took history in his hands and bent the arc of the moral universe towards justice. >> no one can deny the indelible contributions and sacrifices that nelson mandela made and for the people
a woman, i'm an immigrant, i'm hispanic. i don't qualify for aarp membership yet. and i am a republican. sadly, i'm an endangered species right now. and i often get asked how can you possibly be a republican? why are you a republican? the explanation lies in my personal history. my family's story is what shaped my political views. i came here in 1980. i was born in nicaragua. there was a communist revolution, the sandinistas came to power in 1979 after a three-year, bloody civil war. it turned out the sandinistas were also communists. by the way, i don't know if you know a sandinista got elected mayor in new york, and they quickly went about instituting communism in our little country. my parents were not fans of redistribution of wealth, and at that point they made the decision of getting out of nicaragua. my father stayed behind, he became a contra, a freedom fighter. and when your father's a guerrilla struggling to bring freedom back the your country, you realize at an early age that politics matter. election results matter. being a bystander is not an option. being involved is what
on immigration, when it will be put forward, what form it will take. the speaker of the house bringing an end to a top assistant on the issue who is -- as part of senator mccain's term when it was mccain kennedy into does a six and seven on the amnesty bill. where you are going? >> we don't do well as a nation when we do these big, comprehensive things. you see what happened with obamacare. immigration is no different. the chairman has said the right approach, done the right thing. that is ultimately where the house goes. lou: for whenever it matters, i have endorsed chairman good lot, his plan to my proposal command approach. i have not heard the same thing from the speaker. i have heard you talking more like the gang of eight is his preference. during the biddinggof tom donahue over the chamber of commerce. which is the reality? >> i think the chairman will be the reality. i sit on the judiciary committee. we're taking these in a piecemeal basis. i think we will get a good bill that is going to be an incremental bill, but that is the way we should be doing it. we need to solve some of the r
immigration reform, health care reform, and a budget. is there a timetable on those? is there a way to get those or is this an ongoing process? >> we talked about the button aggressions that are underway. when it comes to the effort to pass conference of immigration reform, the president believes the congress can act and should act as soon as possible. they can act right away, thousand could, when it comes to these issues. they are not gone yet. they ought to do something >> we talked about the button aggressions that are underway. when it comes to the effort to pass conference of immigration reform, the president believes the congress can act and should act as soon as possible. they can act right away, thousand could, when it comes to these issues. they are not gone yet. they ought to do something between now and their departure that could signal to the american people, in the case of the farm bill, that we have all of the necessary elements of that important legislation taken up -- taking care of on behalf of americans who depend on food and efficient assistance. and when it comes to con
. more than half of americans also don't like the way he is handling foreign policy. immigration and the economy. the data now raising concerns over what can still be accomplished in his next few years as president. joining us now is our political panel angela mcgrewen, fox knew political analyst, and ronow molono. the president used to enjoy euphoric ratings. now his approval rating is abysmal on all kinds of issues. so ways happening overall? why is this happening? what kind of take do you look at this -- what prism do you look at this through, angela? >> the bottom line is this. are you better off today than you were four years ago? most americans that elected this president yet again, now they're having buyers remorse, because most americans are not better off. if you look at the unemployment rate at 7% but for the black community, last check, it was 13%. the hispanic community has not lowered that much and for women and young adults, if you have a college degree, kelly, most people don't have a job today, so people are looking at this situation and though the president is a
to get things done. like immigration, like a lot of things in implementing fully obama care? >> to me there's an interesting thing here of what comes between those two points. if you look at the speech he gave on economic justice wednesday, clearly the president has big ideas, has a big agenda. he's not done with that. these are things he's discussed from the very beginning since he began running in 2007. to me what was interesting in watching your interview yesterday was when he talked about republicans. it's not he's completely resigned to the obstructionism, that they've presented, but i didn't get a sense of a lot of fight. he talked about being persistent. but i think if he wants to rally those segments that robert talked about and he referred to at the interview, he has to be concrete in what he's asking people to rally behind. take some of these grand ideas that he talked about on wednesday that he's talked about before whether it's raising the minimum wage, expanding head start to get investment going. whatever he talked about, he has more credibility now with these new employ
hopes to get a governoring majority in both houses where he's able to get things done. like immigration, like a lot of things in implementing fully obama care? >> to me there's an interesting thing here of what comes between those two points. if you look at the speech he gave on economic justice wednesday, clearly the president has big ideas, has a big agenda. he's not done with that. these are things he's discussed from the very beginning since he began running in 2007. to me what was interesting in watching your interview yesterday was when he talked about republicans. it's not he's completely resigned to the obstructionism, but i didn't get a sense of a lot of fight. he talked about being persistent. but i think if they want to rally -- and he referred to it. he has to be concrete in what he's to rally behind. take some of these grand ideas that he talked about on wednesday that he's talked about before whether it's raising the minimum wage, expanding head start to get investment going. he has more credibility now with these new employment numbers and making it concrete. sending bill
engaged in the agenda. >> three things the president wanted to see, immigration reform, a farm bill, and a budget. about to leave. any sort of timetable on those. is there any way to get those. or is it an ongoing process. talked about budget negotiations that are under way. and when it comes to the farm effort the -- and the to pass comprehensive the ration reform, president believes the congress should act and can act as soon as possible and can act right away, the house could, when it comes to these issues. bill. farm >> it couldn't -- >> that's a shame if that's the case. they're not gone yet. they ought to do something etween now and their departure that could signal to the the casepeople that in of a farm bill that we have all the necessary elements of that important legislation taken care tural behalf of our agricul sector as well as on behalf of americans who depend on food and nutrition assistance. and when it comes to comprehensive immigration reform. conservatives have said in the past that there are many things about comprehensive immigration reform that conservatives
2014 budget. the farm bill. and immigration reform. reaching across the aisle has become more and more difficult and principled compromise seems like a mountain too tall to climb. this morning, i have the honor of introducing two national leaders who can hopefully help shed some light on how our legislative colleagues in washington, d.c. and the white house might be able to come together and find solutions to our nation's critical problems. let me begin with governor huntsman. he began his public service as a staff assistant to ronald reagan. he has since served four u.s. presidents in critical roles, including u.s. ambassador to singapore, deputy assistant secretary of commerce for asia, u.s. trade ambassador and most recently, u.s. ambassador to china. twice elected as utah's governor, he brought about strong economic reforms, tripled the state's rainy day fund, and helped bring unemployment rates to historic lows. in his tenure, utah was named the best state in america and the best state in which to do business. he serves as co-chair of no labels with u.s. senator joe masden. it's w
challenges whether fiscal, immigration, fixing the health care bill. whatever it is, american people want answers, solutions. you can play the party game, political fight, it ends up blowing up in your face. republicans if you look head to head suffer more of the criticism. that's just the fact and reality. >> the president has done divisive politics and deflection and some in your party have done race-baiting. you are right, chris, they want solutions. they don't want politics, they want policy. people are tired of living paycheck to paycheck losing their homes. some people can't get a job. >> how do we get there, angela? what do you do in washington? >> if you continue to have partisanship, you're going to have a lame duck president. i believe midterm elections, gop has a grand opportunity to reach out to those pop that have suffered the most. they can take over the house and senate if they do grassroots advocacy, if the tea party and party establishment would join as one we have a grand opportunity. >> chris, last word. >> a lot of this is going to fall on republicans come midterms, wh
a longer budget, even if a tiny budge so they can get back to talking about immigration. immigration advocates want a budget deal so maybe they can move on from talking about immigration reform or talking about the farm bill, which is hugely important. we haven't really heard a lot about it. >> to your point, an interesting number, in paul ryan's original budget which everyone decried as incredibly conservative budget, the expected spending in 2014 was 1.09 trillion. we will end up with about $1 trillion if wets a deal, less than the original paul ryan budget. the debate has clearly been shifted. paul ryan had different assets delivering more to defense, nondiscretionary but clearly in a place where what we value as increased spending is relative to where we were incredibly low. >> robert, the president has been on a messaging campaign about fairness. his i thought great to osawatomie. >> potato potato. >> also an extension of the knox college speech in 2007. >> these are the themes, i think, of his presidency. also going into the second half of the second term and they couldn't come
. obviously he was an incredible friend and spoken here about immigration and so i just always had a wonderful interaction here with the young people. >> let's play "hardball." you have graduate students here and faculty. there's a resistance among the young people to enrolling in the exchanges and getting involved in taking responsibility for their health care. what's your argument of why they should do that. >> first of all, i understand why people were resistant about going on a website that wasn't working right. fortunately, because of some very hard work, we've now got it to the point where for the vast majority of people it's working well. and my message to young people is, take a look for yourself. the truth is that most college-aged students, because of the law, can stay on their parents' plan and that may be the best deal for them and we've already insured three million people. and your first job where you don't have full health insurance benefits may mean that you stay on your parents' plan a little bit longer. but at some point, let's say when you turn 26, if you're between jobs or
. but then mary herself had an immigration to australia and her colleagues men now than to allow suspects to lunch we don't say nothing compared to twelve people he said. he noted owing to what they believe to be on the gothic jobs that whatever the going with me and i don't need or it can mean the kind kind you can stream in the back. orange calmly steered twenty three years on as karen explains today the protest crew. we at sixty cents now and i know we stayed on strike so dark and we got our governments to change policy. i'm very proud of what we did even though at the time we were. he looked us as being absolute nut cases. and i am very free press and tasman nelson mandela when he came to our land was just it's this to cic and take. the this prior to this the basement and was granted the freedom of dublin to stand still standing at the mansion has been to african music running accross the capital. ut game. if i ate before. we want here. tea while. disappearing agents dominated the second day of his visits. the president of the african national congress we should not mistaken it for me. cheney.
with immigration and other things. and it's about an impression the white house has given that it's keeping this uncle at arm's length. but white house aides now say they weren't doing that. he's a 69-year-old man who works at a liquor store near boston and is now kuth up in the president's political migraine. the man's name called omar, the president's uncle. the boston globe previously cited the white house as saying the president and his uncle had never met. but the white house press secretary now says this -- >> the president said that he, in fact, had met omar obama when he moved to cambridge for law school and he stayed with him for a brief period of time until his -- the president's apartment was ready. >> reporter: in recent days the uncle said barack obama stayed with him for three weeks in the 1980s. why the differing accounts? >> back when this arose, folks looked at the record including the president's book and there was no evidence that they had met. >> reporter: jay carney says it was when he asked the president in person that the president acknowledged he had stayed with his
or smaller things? >> the first thing i would actually like to see in congress is comprehensive immigration reform. i mean, if you look at what the senate did, there is a path there that a lot of people compromised on to create a path to citizenship plus ways of making sure that we take people out of the shadows, we grow our economy, and we make sure our borders are secure. and so first and foremost, the house of representatives needs to focus on that. and i was part of the fast for families yesterday. i have been arrested on the whole process of trying to get to immigration reform and whatnot. in terms of education, this is an issue. pre-k is an issue about showing whether results actually really matter and what the research actually really matters or whether the congress lives in an evidence-free zone. we have seen pre-k actually works to help level the playing field. the president has put a bill out there. the house of representatives actually have a bipartisan bill, that aligns in the house of representatives and the senate, the miller-harkin bill, that has two republicans from new york
the other, that is the real sticking point here. you have immigration. adam: the business community wants some sort of immigration bill to get through congress. any chance we would see this happening or would this be continued delay, delay, delay? >> this would be after the congress in january because it is too big. in order for immigration to succeed it will not be an ominous bill like we had with obamacare. we need incremental bills on immigration talk about security pathway to citizenship, taxation and those type of things in order for immigration bill to go forward. which comes first, the chicken or the egg? a pathway to citizenship. these are the things that have to be ironed out in the open. it also has to be incremental. it cannot be the obamacare 3000 page bill nobody reads. lori: the one risk factor every stock strategist and economist point to are the physical fights, the budget fights we continue to do month after month as the main risk for the market. a promising jobs report for november following the month in october. the market is on a tear, the biggest risk factor for the m
new report, president obama stacking his immigration enforcement office with proopen borders amnesty attorneys. are illegal immigrants getting a free pass thanks to the government? >> he was born a muslim. he read the bible and it changed his life forever. it cost him, his family and his freedom but he said it is worth it. that man's journey to christianity is coming up. ick with innovation. stick with power. stick with technology. get the new flexcare platinum from philips sonicare and save now. philips sonicare. what does that first spoonful taste likok. honey bunches of oats. ching! mmmm! mmmm! mmmm! wow! it's the oats. honey. yeah. honey bunches of oats. this is a great cereal. >>> let's hear, the deck is being stacked at the department of homeland security. a shocking media report, details the recent mass hiring of immigration lawyers. nearly all pro-amnesty. so even if the obama administration can't officially change immigration policy, these lawyers can help illegal immigrants stay in the country regardless of the law. joining us now is the author of that report, former d. o.j
endorsement here. obviously he was an incredible friend and had spoken here about immigration. i always have a wonderful interaction with the young people here. they're doing a great job. >> well, let's play "hardball." >> let's do it. >> you have a great audience here of college age people and graduate students an faculty. there's some resistance out there among young people. have seen it in the polls to enrolling in the exchanges and get involved in taking responsibility for their health care. what's your argument why they should do that? >> well, first of all, i understand why people would have been resistant to going on a website that wasn't working right. and fortunately because of some very hard work, we've now got it to the point where for the vast majority of people it's working well. and my message to the young people is take a look for yourself. the truth is that most college-aged students because of the law can stay on their parents' plan and they may be the best deal for them. we've already insured about 3 million people. and your first job where you don't have full health insura
announcements today. >> the president said he wanted to see immigration reform, health care reform, and a budget. is there a timetable on those? is there a way to get those or is this an ongoing process? >> we talked about the button aggressions that are underway. the effort toto pass conference of immigration reform, the president believes the congress can act and should act as soon as possible. they can act right away, thousand could, when it comes to these issues. they are not gone yet. they ought to do something between now and their departure that could signal to the american people, in the case of have allbill, that we of the necessary elements of that important legislation taken up -- taking care of on behalf of americans who depend on food and efficient assistance. and when it comes to conference of immigration reform, as i've said in the past, and conservatives have said in the past, there are many things that conservatives could make a strong case for, including strong economic growth, including bringing people out of the shadows and making sure that they get to the back of the line in
an immigrant of british subjects but i want to be seen as an american and melson -- nelson mandela was able to create that image. we are not black south africans or white south africans, we are one family, one nation, when people. i hope that his image and spirit will live on for generations to come. l, a trailblazer himself, the u.s. secretary of state who is black on the man who inspired him so much. dozens of people have gathered outside nelson mandela's former home and so it oh -- in soweto. our respondent who filed this report. paying tribute to the father the nation. he was the consummate reconciler. this was the house he would return to when he was released in prison. in february of 1990. we met one of mr. mandela's neighbors. met those who lived in the same street. >> i went with him to introduce him to the neighbor. after so many years being away from there. them. -- he still loves he still remembered their names. >> when i went to school here in the late 1970s and i 1980s, he was still in prison. there was no road here. all of this was dead road. spirit ofodied the the fight again
or background. i am proud of being black and proud of being an immigrant of british subjects but i want to be seen as an american and melson -- nelson mandela was able to create that image. we are not black south africans or white south africans, we are one family, one nation, when people. i hope that his image and spirit will live on for generations to come. l, a trailblazer himself, the u.s. secretary of state who is black on the man who inspired him so much. dozens of people have gathered outside nelson mandela's former home and so it oh -- in soweto. our respondent who filed this report. paying tribute to the father the nation. he was the consummate reconciler. this was the house he would return to when he was released in prison. in february of 1990. we met one of mr. mandela's neighbors. met those who lived in the same street. >> i went with him to introduce him to the neighbor. after so many years being away from there. them. -- he still loves he still remembered their names. >> when i went to school here in the late 1970s and i 1980s, he was still in prison. there was no road her
, immigration. needless to say, for a period of time, this will obviously involve israeli participation. it has to. but there also have to be objective standards by which we measure performance. the former police commissioner in boston, ed davis, who is widely respected in the law- enforcement community, was in the west bank in august offering his strategic counsel. we will work with this as professionally as anybody has ever done. we will not leave things to chance. there is a serious responsibility that comes with statehood. and i have shared that notion with my friends in the west bank, and they take it seriously. they do. it will take time to train, build, equip, and test palestinian institutions to ensure that they are capable of protecting palestinian citizens. their primary responsibility is that. and also preventing their territory from being used for attacks on israel. now, i have heard all the arguments. we pulled out of lebanon. look what we got. we got rockets. we pulled out of gaza. look what we got. we got rockets. yeah, we did, but we also didn't settle any of the issues. unilate
lower pray, fewer hours happen that was one big issue. we have had a million or so immigrants come here every year. so we are having an influx of lower wage earners. but you can't talk about income, without talking about stagnant wages. is stagnant medium incomes we are seeing. >> . >> and that's a drag on economy, if the people at the lower end, don't have money they can spend on small businesses. >> yes, exactly. that's a circumstance lat effect that is happening. a lot of folks tend to stay in the same place. if they are on the lower end they tend to stay on that lower end. >> what should the gov do about it? >> this many things. the president talked about obama-care, is his signature measure. be uh there's many other things we talk about every national election we have, these things come up. things like universal prek, unemployment benefits, ebbing panning those. >> expanding the social safety nets so people at the lower end have more, what about people at the top that have gotten much of the wealth? should we be taxing them more? >> that's a very important part. now if you look at
beast. his parents were immigrants to the united states from south africa. also with us, cnn political commentator, the republican strategist, ana navarro. peter, i will start with you. you wrote a very compelling article. i will put a line up on the screen because i want you to explain to our viewers what you meant. as with dr. martin luther king, it is this subversive aspect of mandela's legacy that is most in danger of being erased as he enters america's pantheon of sanitized moral icons but it is precisely the aspect that americans most badly need. tell us what's being left out of mandela's story today. >> for most of his life as an activist against apartheid, the united states government was supportive of south africa's apartheid regime because they were our allies in the cold war. we have been taught since the cold war by politicians that have said it again and again that the cold war was simply a struggle for freedom in which we were on the side of the angels and the soviet union was on the side ofevil. the soviet union was an evil regime but there is another story of the cold w
criminals. component, of course, is to provide a network to monitor organized crime and illegal immigration. often to save the lives of people in distress at sea. critics say the system is more about turning away migrants than helping them. it started operation on the southern and eastern borders. monday, the un's human rights chief has evidence that syrian government officials have committed crimes against humanity. she called on the international criminal court to open a probe into the civil war. she said responsibility for atrocities committed in the searing conflict extended to the top echelon of government, including president bashar al- assad. brewers started lobbying for a year unity lot. they are hope -- a beer unity law. in 1516, the bearberry and ruler decreed beer could only be made with water, malt, hops, and yeast and nothing else. there was relative calm on the streets of the thai capital after days of angry protests. police itrs and should can says the government took steps to calm a dangerous escalation of violence. police were ordered to stand back as demonstrators calling
are different pots on the same stove. that's what has changed. immigrants used to come here. my great grand parents would come here and make sure their kids learned evening lish. that was important. they came to this country and they wanted every generation to be more successful jie. and they didn't want to bring the filthy language they knew. >> thank you. >> and there is a fine line between preserving your culture and heritage. my great grandparents italy ant want to speak italian. they shut off the lights on their italian family members and they would say we are not home because they didn't speak english. >> chef boy-ardie is outside. >> they were racist against their own kind. >> you also want to do what is best for you and your family to get along in the new culture. it is something you are fighting fighting and america will have to fight. >> it is not just the school district, but it is people doing the battle going on in people's houses. >> absolutely. >> young and old. >> but like you said, you are now -- what used to be the norm, you are a bigot if you suggest that is a good idea.
% approve. on the economy, a whopping 65% disapprove. 31% approve. and on immigration policy, 60% disapprove of the president's take, just 32% approve. so you can see the president is standing among americans is at its lowest point ever. the question now becomes can the republican party capitalize in the grand ole party still divided between so-called moderate republicans and committed conservatives. the brawl has been going on for years. and right now the tea party is right in the middle of it. according to real clear politics average, a possible presidential candidates. chris christie a moderate is ahead at 189 percent. conservative rand paul 17%. senator ted cruz 12%. florida senator marco rubio 12%. congressman paul ryan 11%. and jeb bush 10.5%: all these men have a chance to run against hillary clinton in 2016. mrs. clinton is far ahead of any democratic challenger and will remain so. with americans disenchanted by obama care and a bad economy, it would seem the republicans would have some momentum, but they don't. because there is not one clear message. and even on philosophy, politic
undocumented immigrants than any president previous president in the history of the united states. so there are some things that the president has done to really annoy the latino voter. now, i have to add and caution people who might say this ii a great chance now for the republicans. the way the republicans can torpedo this chance among hispanic social security to keep a point of view when it comes to immigration reform. i think if republicans are smart now, they will seize this obvious decline in popularity, this reflex approval of the president among latinos and say, as bill o'reilly has said, as sean hannity has said, let's be more open minded and more modern and let's be more reform oriented when it comes to immigration. we can get this vital voting block on our corner. >> who is doing that right now? >> who on the republican side? >> who in your mind? >> there are some voices. mostly comment tears. i have to say, rather than elected officials. you hear people like cantor, for instance, these are guys -- paul ryan, these are guys that could very easily influence the gop away from
% approve. and on immigration policy, 60% disapprove of the president's take, just 32% approve. so you can see the president is standing among americans is at its lowest point ever. the question now becomes can the republican party capitalize in the grand ole party still divided between so-called moderate republicans and committed conservatives. the brawl has been going on for years. and right now the tea party is right in the middle of it. according to real clear politics average, a possible presidential candidates. chris christie a moderate is ahead at 189 percent. conservative rand paul 17%. senator ted cruz 12%. florida senator marco rubio 12%. congressman paul ryan 11%. and jeb bush 10.5%: all these men have a chance to run against hillary clinton in 2016. mrs. clinton is far ahead of any democratic challenger and will remain so. with americans disenchanted by obama care and a bad economy, it would seem the republicans would have some momentum, but they don't. because there is not one clear message. and even on philosophy, political philosophy, the party is deeply divided. it will ta
's by no means a lot of them. but sure enough the influx of immigrants court alien french culture as courageous use problems for frost. you love to be two mistakes he amassed from the band is a healthy organization for frost. skoda is the same kind of organization. that's a good peaceful one. i thought that the partition independence square. more liberal participants keen to distance themselves from school but that he might answer there are lots of radicals they don't represent all people this is a small number the sea being provoked said we think is a bad thing because it's damaging the image of the revelation and ninety nine and anonymity master list flags and slogans on the square testified to a marriage of convenience that could prescribe the inconvenient for ukraine's opposition in the future. our days of tough negotiations are on top and sides agree on the indonesian island of bali resulting was described as an historic deal for the world trade organization let it fall short sometimes expectations of taxing its commitments to simplify customs procedures it can also add spaces they say eco
, the mustard. >> opened on new york's lower east side in 1888, katz's jewish immigrant founders brought their recipes for cured beef from eastern europe. >> is there an art to making a good sandwich? >> it's an art form. every piece of meat is different. got to treat it like you would a baby. >> does katz's ever advertise? >> no. you don't need to. >> it's all word of mouth. >> yes! yes! >> it was in katz's where harry met sally in the 1989 film and had their famously orgasmic meal. katz's name isn't even mentioned in the movie. but word got around. >> i'll have what she's having. >> oh, yeah. >> this summer 20 couples from the comedy group improv everywhere, slipped in to katz's and recreated the movie scene. >> oh, yes! >> did you know that was coming? >> no idea. >> you thought about joining in? >> no. >> what has that movie scene meant to this business? >> every once in awhile a review, that movie put you on the back. we were here a hundred years before the movie was made. >> it didn't hurt. >> you need a ticket to get in. they will charge you $50 if you lose it. it's how katz's kee
obama and the delay with the immigration case and the delay in the mandate and the libya case which the republicans lot of and the carbon emissions case that went up to the circuit court, they lot of every single case in any court of law they tried using and lot of everything in a court of public opinion. >> for him to say he is going against it is settled by the stream court. you are going after conservative supreme court with the law of the land. >> it's the point that you get down to with republican opposition with the president. it's not the specifics, but the fact that he is attempting to use any powers of the president and isn't that what gets down to the feeling that a lot of minorities have about the basic disrespect for his ability to be president. >> absolutely. if you look at president bush, he won with 51% of the vote. he had swagger and said this is what i'm going to do and every member of congress was behind it. the president won almost a landslide election and the majority voted him in and every time he tries to negotiate anything, he is being in competition. there is
more than one in ten students drop out. born to poor immigrant parents in the west african nation of cape verde, dipina knows well the barriers to a child's success. >> i used my-- as a motivation. today as an education-- educator i tell my students don't use your personal issues as an impediment, to come to school. sues it as a motivation. because it will pay off. >> reporter: he says the words in life of one of africa's greatest elders will long inspire. >> and this is the person i was talking about, nelson mandela. he paved the way for others. and i think that cycle should only continue, if you want to have a better world. >> reporter: many will remember how nelson mandela changed the world, including one kid in the bleachers who was moved to try to do the same one classroom at a time. >> there is no easy walk to freedom anywhere. >> reporter: jim axelrod, cbs news, boston. >> pelley: in a moment, bill clinton's very personal remembrance of nelson mandela. mandela. o cold liast thds. asthma doesn't affect my job... you missed the meeting again last week! it doesn't affect my fa
ranging from the economy through immigration. perhaps the real question here is show the maker's be searching for aliens are focusing on the issues right here on planet earth. and wanna update you on the breaking news that we've been falling former south african president nelson mandela just passed away a short time ago he was at ninety five years old. mandela has been viewed as a hero to people all around the world and was the biggest leader against apartheid. his health has been failing consistently over the past few months due to a recurring lung infection in his last in the hostel in september but was discharged and allowed to return home he was a nobel peace prize moderate and one of south africa's most beloved presidents of all time. our hearts go out to his family has made it for now from one story to cover go to youtube dot com slash rt america check our website for the latest on the nelson mandela story and follow me on twitter at meg and underscore lopez aussie about kerry. you see the world reading for globally minded people. hunters and underwriters local contact us
the case and i hope immigration reform is something that should happen. what can the leaders learn as they tackle the issues and being the leader? >> exact low. i'm not an expert in immigration, but i know this. no nation has prospered by cutting off immigration. no situation where that happens. how they get here legally is a matter of debate, but the fact is you go to silicon valley in california and out of the top five guys, maybe three are immigrants. we do not want to cutoff the brain, but we should welcome people. they say you have something to contribute to our nation? welcome. >> pastor, can i ask you about mental illness? >> sure. >> i was at an event where a woman's son committed suicide. she now goes to schools to talk to teens about these things that kids have a hard time connectioning on or talking about. she brings a dog to break the ice and try to get a conversation going. i look and wondered how she continues. what drives her. i know you had a terribly similar situation. >> yeah. mental illness is the last taboo. nobody wants to talk about it. ten years ago we took t
of issues from income inequality to raising the minimum wage to immigration. what issues will be at the forefront of his agenda as we enter 2014? >> i think he would like to see something get done on minimum wage but i'm not sure much can get done. all eyes will turn to this budget deal between representsive ryan and murray to see if they can prevent another shutdown. >> thanks for your time as always, kevin. >> thanks for having me. >> this is "first look" on msnbc. stay with msnbc for more coverage of nelson mandela's death. "way too early" starts right now. >> i have challenan idea of a democratic and free society in which all persons live together in harmony. and -- and with equal opportunity. it is what i hope to live for and to achieve. but if need be it is for which i am prepared to die. >> nelson mandela, lived to see a free democracy in south africa. this morning, his passing at age 95 means different things to people in different generations, from starting out as a lawyer and man of action to political prisoner to symbol to historic leader, to an icon and living
-year-old andy kimm who immigrated from south korea went through the program and is now a full-time stylist. >> the first time i couldn't do this very well. i couldn't but a lot of people helped and now i can. >> reporter: he's making more than $30,000 a year but he knows that there's great opportunity for growth in a high end salon like this. owner diane fisher says all it takes are the skills required along with hard work and a very nice salary could follow. >> there's been some that make $200,000 a year. >> reporter: styling hair? >> yes, yes. >> reporter: what do you think about that? >> i think it's wonderful. it makes me feel really good. i love it. >> local career counselor colleen smith says waiters at nice restaurant, temp workers and seasonal workers can make more than $15 an hour. >>> in today's health alert, the shopping impact of measles even now 50rbgs years after a high -- 50 years after a highly effective vaccine was approved. the virus still kills more than 400 children a day worldwide. health officials say people infected overseas are sparking outbreaks with u
and the president has not seen his uncle in 20 years. as for omar obama, an immigration judge said he could stay in the country because he qualified for permanent residency. >>> the man once call called america's top cop back in the big apple. new york mayor elect bill deblass yo announced bill bratton as new yorks's police commissioner. he ran the police force 20 years ago and he vowed to repair the relationship between officers and minority neighborhoods amid the nypd's controversial stop and frisk program, a tactic he has embraced in the pass while the incoming mayor has criticized it, bratton said a book he read when he was 9 will guide him on his new beat. >> i checked this thing out so often that i don't think anybody else in boston ever saw it. it is a book about the new york city police department of 1956 and i loved the title "your police." in this city, i want every new yorker to talk about their police, my police, with respect and with confidence that they are going to be respected. >> bratton has led the boston and los angeles police departments. >>> pope francis bringing another big
model in a school where more than one in ten students drop out. born to poor immigrant parents in the west african nation of cape verde, depina knows well barriers to a child's success. >> i use my hardships as a motivation. today as an educator, i tell my students, well, don't use your personal issues as an impediment for not coming to school and not succeeding in school. as a matter of fact, use that as a motivation because later on it will pay off. >> reporter: depina says the words in life of one of africa's greatest elders will long inspire. >> and this is the person i was talking about, nelson mandela. he has paved the way for others, and i think that cycle should only continue if you want to have a better world. >> reporter: many will remember how nelson mandela changed the world, including one kid in the bleachers who was moved to try to do the same one classroom at a time. >> there's no easy walk to freedom anywhere. >> reporter: jim axelrod, cbs news, boston. >>> coming up after your local news on "cbs this morning," special coverage on the death of nelson mandela. we
at the one who is an american accent for natives. or are immigrants to snow. i'm also interested in and how. i'll wear it families can come to this place they didn't and made it home and i struggled and let you know what the left hand in things like that. that is also kind of coming to you some of that. story then headed to town i just did it however to see it essentially. and how we write to me. i know. it all. cheesy yes you . the news on him nelson mandela has passed away the age of ninety five he was south africa's first black president and anti apartheid icon and that south africa's transition from white minority rule in the nineteen nineties to twenty seven years in prison he has been receiving sandstone base medical kit for a lung infection after three months in hospital in a statement in south africa national tv presenter jacob's mom said
the ranges and rile the opponents. >> thai immigration workers hand over myanmar refugees to human trafficking rings. an inquiry has been called for. rohingya muslims are taken from detention centres and handed to criminals who are waiting offshore. the u.n. general assembly elected jordan to the council to replace saudi arabia. jordan was chosen after saudi arabia rejected the seat in october. it was a protest against the council's failure to end the syrian and israeli conflicts. conciliatory moves towards iran, chuck hagel made the comment during a dialogue, saying the u.s. would discuss steps to bolster security in the renaling jog. hagel says that the u.s. must continue diplomatic engagement in the middle east, maintain planes, ships, tanks and 35,000 troops. >> for decades iran has exported instability and violence across the region and beyond as it developed its nuclear program. iran has been a profoundly destabilising influence in a nuclear armed iran would pose an unaccee threat to regional and global facility. we brought time for meaning negotiation, not for perception. al
with immigration. the same thing that we're going to have to do for voting rights. i just -- he referenced so much work, gave us a road map to do it. >> schieffer: we'll have to leave it there. thank you all so much. >> thank you. >> schieffer: really something. thank you all. we'll be back in a moment. >> i am a yankee! [ male announcer ] celebrate the season -- it's customer appreciation month at subway! come and enjoy two of your favorite six-inch subs -- just $2 each all december long. get the six-inch cold cut combo or the six-inch meatball marinara, built fresh from the bread up just the way you say for just $2. nobody says thank you like this! this december only at subway, where value is served up fresh all day. subway. eat fresh. >> schieffer: well that's all the time we have for today. but we'll be back next week and as we go we want to leave you with more of maya angelou's tribute to nelson mandela. no sun outlasts its sunset but will rise again and bring the dawn yes, mandela's day is done yet we, his inheritors will open the gates wider for reconciliation and we will respond generou
component of course it is to provide the network to monitor and organized crime and illegal immigration and migration of up to date all was that of course also to save the lives of people in distress at sea. he will self seed teams from the soybean seed of sealed them up and gone to bed. but critics say the system is more about turning away migrants than helping them it started operation on the eu southern and eastern borders. also on monday un human rights chief cannot be the day. she is growing evidence that lead in syrian government officials have committed crimes against humanity. she called on the international criminal court to open a probe into the country's civil war delay said responsibility for atrocities committed in the syrian conflict extended to the top echelons of government including president bush are outside germany's brewers started lobbying for the country's beer purity law to be recognized by unesco. they're hoping to have their craft added to the cultural heritage list ahead of the five hundred year anniversary of the law. in fifteen sixteen the bavarian rule a dec
legacy issue. and if you look at the chances of getting immigration reform, of getting some kind of comprehensive jobs bill, of getting some kind of infrastructure, of getting tax reform which is what businesses say they'll need, he may have to use the next three years to make it work, and this may be what he's left with as his big legacy issue. >> but you write it's not just about the website. there are a lot of challenges ahead about will this thing float? >> the website is not fixed, either, particularly on the backhand. you have to deliver the information to theinsurer and you're not getting accurate information to them. they don't know who is signing up. that's the big problem, young people not signing up right now in the numbers they have to to make this work long term, so you'll see problems with people not just losing their insurance policies but beginning to see what these narrow networks in these new policies. i can't keep my doctor, and by the way, maybe the price is not going up in 2014 by policy but by 2015, and that politics is going to roll out and hurt the democra
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